19th Annual Tahoe Bike Month a Win for Tahoe

19th Annual Tahoe Bike Month a Win for Tahoe

Event is growing the region’s commitment to sustainable transportation

 

Lake Tahoe, Calif./Nev. – The 19th annual Tahoe Bike Month achieved record-breaking participation this year, according to the organizers. Through the month of June, a diverse community of 474 Tahoe residents and visitors embraced biking as a sustainable transportation option, collectively logging 9,890 trips covering 78,798 miles and climbing 5,512,602 vertical feet.

The celebration organized by the Tahoe Regional Planning Agency (TRPA) and the Lake Tahoe Bicycle Coalition helps reduce reliance on private automobiles in the region, which protects the environment and encourages healthier, safer communities. TRPA and the Bicycle Coalition saw record participation in more than 20 bike-friendly events and activities, including bike kitchen pop-ups, bike path clean ups, and the Pride Bike Ride.

Reflecting on the success of the event, TRPA senior transportation planner Kira Richardson expressed gratitude.

“We commend all participants for getting out of their cars and experiencing Tahoe’s magnificent paths and trails,” Richardson said. “Your efforts not only promote healthier lifestyles but also contribute significantly to preserving our environment.”

Participants logged their rides on tahoebike.org/bike-month, competing for prizes donated by local businesses. Noteworthy achievements included:

  • In the team category, “Competitive Commuters” emerged victorious, amassing 156 points over the month.
  • “Carson ‘the’ Guy” recorded an impressive 152 rides.
  • Joshua Hutchens dominated in elevation gain with 85,981 vertical feet and covered 1,176 miles, securing the top spot in distance traveled.
  • Mark Hoefer completed the biggest ride, covering 139 miles and ascending 14,423 vertical feet.
  • Of the 474 total participants, 39 biked every day throughout June.

One of those participants who biked every day was Lake Tahoe Bicycle Coalition president Nick Speal.

“The community’s enthusiasm and commitment to biking not only set new records, but also exemplifies our mission to make it safer and more fun to get around Tahoe on two wheels,” said Speal.

Caption: Students at Meyers Elementary School on South Shore line up for prizes. Bike-to-School days are a favorite feature of the annual Bike Month. Credit: Tahoe Regional Planning Agency

Caption: Bikers get tips on bike maintenance and a free tune-up at a pop-up bike kitchen event in Truckee, Calif. Credit: Lake Tahoe Bicycle Coalition

The success of the 19th Annual Tahoe Bike Month was made possible through the generous support of sponsors including Gear Lab, Pine Nut Cycle Cafe, Heavenly Epic Promise, Blue Granite Climbing Gym, and many others.

Looking ahead, organizers hope the momentum from this year’s event will encourage continued biking, walking, and transit use throughout the summer and beyond. For more information on sustainable transportation options in Tahoe, visit LinkingTahoe.com and explore the interactive bike map at map.tahoebike.org.

Tahoe Bike Month will return in June 2025.

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The Tahoe Regional Planning Agency leads the cooperative effort to preserve, restore, and enhance the unique natural and human environment of the Lake Tahoe Region, while improving local communities, and people’s interactions with our irreplaceable environment.

The Lake Tahoe Bicycle Coalition works to make Tahoe more bicycle-friendly by providing the free Tahoe Bike Map, free and discounted bike racks, promoting bike safety, bike valet at events, and ongoing advocacy. Learn more at www.tahoebike.org.

Settlement Reached in Lake Tahoe Workforce Housing Litigation

Settlement Reached in Lake Tahoe Workforce Housing Litigation

Contact: Jeff Cowen, 775-589-5278

TRPA Solutions to Environmental, Equity Issues Remain Unchanged by Settlement Agreement

Lake Tahoe, Calif./Nev. – The Tahoe Regional Planning Agency (TRPA) and Mountain Area Preservation (MAP) reached a settlement agreement this week over a lawsuit brought by MAP against affordable housing policies approved by the TRPA Governing Board in December 2023. The litigation sought to block new land use policies in the highly protected Lake Tahoe Region that combined incentives for water quality, transportation, and workforce housing improvements, according to TRPA.

According to the settlement agreement, MAP will be invited to join other organizations on the Tahoe Living Working Group that TRPA formed in 2020 to advise on housing policies.

“We look forward to engaging Mountain Area Preservation in a more productive dialogue along with the full range of stakeholders,” TRPA Executive Director Julie Regan said. “We must keep the Tahoe Basin moving forward to address an affordable housing crisis that is impacting Lake Tahoe’s environment and marginalizing members of our community who deserve to live and work here. Resort communities everywhere are facing similar challenges, but we have proven over the years that environmental protection and community revitalization can go hand-in-hand.”

“We are satisfied that the settlement supports the Governing Board’s decision and shows that TRPA’s high environmental standards can be maintained while advancing more affordable and workforce housing projects,” said TRPA General Counsel John Marshall. “Across the nation, we are seeing important environmental laws being leveraged to block equitable housing policies. Fortunately, the MAP litigation was short-lived and the agency is able to apply its time and resources to the important work of modernizing land-use policies.”

TRPA has kicked off a new phase of housing policy work and seeks additional perspectives on the Tahoe Living Working Group the agency formed in 2020 to advise on housing policies. According to the settlement agreement, MAP will be invited to join other organizations on the working group.

“We are pleased to have reached a settlement that paves the way for more inclusive and equitable housing policies in the Lake Tahoe Basin,” TRPA Board Chair and Placer County Supervisor Cindy Gustafson said. “Moving these critical policy updates forward will help us support our region’s local workforce. The agreement underscores our commitment to addressing the housing needs of our community while preserving the natural beauty and environmental integrity of Lake Tahoe.”

Under the direction of the TRPA Governing Board, in 2020 the agency set out three phases of affordable and workforce housing policy work. The first phase approved in July 2021 encouraged more accessory dwelling units for local workers and made it easier to convert small motels to residential uses. The Phase 2 amendments approved last December made it possible for property owners building deed-restricted affordable and workforce housing to apply for building incentives that result in appropriately designed multi-family or mixed-use buildings in certain areas, as long as they improve walkability and include water quality improvements. With the signing of the settlement agreement, those policies can move forward as originally proposed with no cloud of legal challenge, according to TRPA.

The TRPA Governing Board approved technical clarifications to the December policy updates and new policies requiring affordable housing as part of mixed-use projects at its meeting Wednesday, June 26.

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The Tahoe Regional Planning Agency leads the cooperative effort to preserve, restore, and enhance the unique natural and human environment of the Lake Tahoe Region, while improving local communities, and people’s interactions with our irreplaceable environment. For additional information, contact Jeff Cowen, Public Information Officer, at (775) 589-5278 or jcowen@trpa.gov.

TRPA Approves Climate Smart Policies

TRPA Approves Climate Smart Policies

Housing, Forest Health, and Transportation Actions to Support Tahoe

 

Lake Tahoe/Stateline, Nev. – The Tahoe Regional Planning Agency (TRPA) Governing Board on Wednesday made a range of approvals that help address Lake Tahoe’s housing, climate, transportation, and forest health challenges and reflect the top priorities of the Governing Board, the agency said today.

“We are committed to innovating and strengthening the Regional Plan to protect the lake and our communities,” said TRPA Executive Director Julie Regan. “We are grateful to the Governing Board for its direction and support for regional programs, policies, and projects that advance our mission and uphold the commitment to the Bi-State Compact.”

Climate Smart Policies
  • Solar energy system projects can apply for special land coverage allowances, and rooftop solar projects that meet scenic standards are exempt from TRPA permit processes.
  • Twenty percent of parking spaces for new or improved parking lots of 20 spaces or more must be capable of electric vehicle charging.
  • Dark sky protection standards for exterior lighting require cutoff shields and limit lumens and light color temperature, among other design and lighting use improvements.
  • Large events must include transportation strategies such as bike valet, shuttle services, rideshare drop off locations, and communication with attendees about alternative transportation
Forest Resilience
  • Approval of a 252-acre forest fuel reduction project at Homewood Mountain Resort to continue reducing wildfire risk and protecting communities on Lake Tahoe’s West Shore. The resort is the largest private parcel of land in the Tahoe Basin. West side forests in the watershed have a heavy fuel load due to topography and microclimate and are a high priority for treatment for Tahoe Fire and Fuels Team partners.
Tahoe Living and Community Revitalization Policies
  • Ten percent of all residential units in new condominium projects must be a mix of affordable- and moderate-income housing, located on or off site of the project..
  • Mixed-use (commercial/residential/tourist accommodation) projects must follow best practices for pedestrian-oriented design and the amount and location of commercial space included in the project.
  • Technical clarifications to existing policies reserve 50 percent of TRPA affordable and workforce housing bonus units for projects deed-restricted to affordable income levels. Of the remaining half, 25 percent are reserved for deed-restricted affordable- or moderate-income housing and 25 percent can be applied to affordable, moderate, or achievable housing.
Keeping Tahoe Moving and Sustainable Recreation
  • Approval of the final phase of Nevada State Parks Spooner Lake Front Country Improvement Project to add a non-motorized watercraft launch and wildlife viewing pier to the lake. Earlier phases added water quality best management practices for the entire project area, a visitor center, educational amphitheater, restrooms, pathway signage, and parking improvements.
  • Data and analysis report on regional transportation and sustainable communities strategies. The agency is in the process of engaging the public and transportation partners to update the 2050 Regional Transportation Plan.

The board also approved the agency’s overall workplan and budget for the coming year and received reports on forest health projects and priorities.

TRPA’s strategic priorities will accelerate environmental and transportation improvements to bolster the region’s climate and help create complete communities that provide housing for all, according to the agency’s workplan.

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The Tahoe Regional Planning Agency leads the cooperative effort to preserve, restore, and enhance the unique natural and human environment of the Lake Tahoe Region, while improving local communities, and people’s interactions with our irreplaceable environment. For additional information, contact Jeff Cowen, Public Information Officer, at (775) 589-5278 or jcowen@trpa.gov.

Lake Tahoe Awarded $24 Million for East Shore Transportation and Trails

Lake Tahoe Awarded $24 Million for East Shore Transportation and Trails

Project will transform transportation, mobility, and safety on the State Route 28 Corridor

 

Lake Tahoe/Stateline, Nev. — The Tahoe Transportation District (TTD) and the Tahoe Regional Planning Agency (TRPA) are announcing the awarding of a $24 million Rebuilding American Infrastructure with Sustainability and Equity (RAISE) grant to TTD to improve the State Route 28 Corridor along Tahoe’s East Shore. U.S. Senators Catherine Cortez Masto (D-Nev.) and Jacky Rosen (D-Nev.) pushed to secure this funding through the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law with the assistance and support from the TRPA and 12 partner agencies under the Lake Tahoe Environmental Improvement Program (EIP).

This pivotal federal funding will support implementation of the next phase of the State Route 28 Corridor Management Plan from Sand Harbor State Park to Thunderbird Cove, one of the most visited recreation corridors in the Lake Tahoe Basin. The multi-benefit project will improve water quality, enhance public safety, provide equitable recreation access, and reduce roadway congestion, according to TTD and TRPA. Bringing forward improvements that make it easier to recreate at Tahoe without a private vehicle is fundamental to the Regional Transportation Plan and the Lake Tahoe Destination Stewardship Plan.

“Securing the $24 million RAISE grant marks a significant advancement in delivering safe and sustainable transportation options for both residents and visitors,” said Carl Hasty, District Manager of the Tahoe Transportation District. “By upgrading the 1.75-mile trail from Sand Harbor and addressing the State Route 28 corridor needs, we will greatly enhance mobility, alleviate traffic congestion, and reduce environmental impacts.”

“Tahoe’s East Shore is one of Nevada’s most scenic recreation areas that is important to the regional economy and to ensuring all Nevadans have access to outdoor recreation,” said Nevada Governor Joe Lombardo. “Funding for corridor improvements will greatly improve public safety and promote a healthy and sustainable outdoor recreation economy centered on protecting Nevada’s natural resources.”

“The next phase of the East Shore Corridor project will ensure equitable access to Tahoe’s outdoors while improving safety and protecting the lake’s beauty and clarity,” Tahoe Regional Planning Agency Executive Director Julie Regan said. “The improvements along this corridor are advancing the region’s vision to create a more bikeable and walkable transportation experience while reducing impacts on the environment and our local communities.”

Key project components include:
  • Trail Expansion: Extend the 3-mile trail an additional 1.75 miles from Sand Harbor to Thunderbird Cove to provide a safe and scenic route for pedestrians and cyclists.
  • Parking Solutions: Develop managed parking solutions in several key segments to keep cars from parking on the highway and improve pedestrian and bike safety.
  • Water Quality: Reduce stormwater runoff and erosion on steep slopes and impacted road shoulders to protect the clarity of the lake.
  • Improve Transit Access: Increase transit availability in the corridor to decrease cars and congestion.

The project will also implement priority actions in TTD’s Regional Transit Plan and is a funding priority for TRPA in its role as the federally designated Tahoe Metropolitan Planning Organization, or TMPO. The East Shore is just one of Tahoe’s recreation corridors in need of transportation improvements to protect the environment, access, and safety, according to the agencies.

“We are beyond excited that TTD has been awarded a RAISE grant to help extend the East Shore Trail to Thunderbird Cove, and eventually all the way to Spooner Summit,” said Amy Berry, Tahoe Fund CEO. “It was exactly five years ago this week that 14 partner organizations and hundreds of philanthropic donors came together to open the first stretch of the Trail. Thanks to TTD’s continued support, and now the RAISE grant, the East Shore Trail has become an extraordinary example of the power of public-private partnerships to improve the Lake Tahoe environment for all to enjoy.”

Wesley Rice, Chair of the Douglas County Board of Commissioners and member of the TTD and TRPA Board of Directors said, “Enhancing outdoor recreation opportunities and infrastructure are important investments in the Tahoe Basin economy and support environmental improvements that protect water quality, quality of life for our residents, and quality of the recreation experience for visitors. Douglas County is proud to be one of the founding agencies supporting a recreational trail around the Nevada portion of Lake Tahoe. The Douglas County Board of Commissioners prioritized these trail improvements through its Trails Master Plan. We are grateful to our partners and Congressional delegation for the work they are doing to make this vision a reality.”

“This significant investment in the Tahoe East Shore Trail reaffirms our commitment to preserving Nevada’s natural beauty while enhancing the safety and accessibility of our outdoor spaces. We are grateful to our partners for their unwavering dedication to protecting Lake Tahoe’s natural resources while providing world-class outdoor recreation opportunities.” said Nevada Department of Conservation and Natural Resources Director James Settelmeyer.

“These federal dollars will go a long way toward meeting our shared goal of implementing sustainable improvements along the State Route 28 corridor,” said Forest Supervisor, Erick Walker. “As the largest land manager in the Tahoe Basin, we recognize our responsibility to enhance the recreational experience for all who visit Lake Tahoe, while also protecting the land and water.”

For details on Tahoe Transportation District and its current projects, visit www.TahoeTransportation.org or call (775) 589-5500.

Media Contacts:

Tiara Wasner
Public Information Officer
Tahoe Transportation District
twasner@tahoetransportation.org
(775) 589-5504

Jeff Cowen
Public Information Officer
Tahoe Regional Planning Agency
jcowen@trpa.gov
(775) 589-5278

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About Tahoe Transportation District

The Tahoe Transportation District (TTD) is a bi-state agency responsible for the management and implementation of safe, environmentally sound, multi-modal transportation projects and programs in the Lake Tahoe Region, including transit operations. TTD leads multi-jurisdictional infrastructure projects to make travel safer, improve access to recreation, and reduce traffic congestion and private car use. TTD focuses on transit’s pivotal role in improving air and water quality because more than 70 percent of the pollutants impacting Lake Tahoe’s clarity come from transportation system and built environment run-off. TTD has delivered numerous projects to help reduce environmental impacts and address the high demand residents and visitors place on the region’s transportation infrastructure, including transit solutions, roadway and safety enhancements, water quality improvements, and pedestrian/cyclist paths. For more information, please visit TahoeTransportation.org.

About Tahoe Regional Planning Agency

The Tahoe Regional Planning Agency leads the cooperative effort to preserve, restore, and enhance the unique natural and human environment of the Lake Tahoe Region, while improving local communities, and people’s interactions with our irreplaceable environment.

About Tahoe Metropolitan Planning Organization

As the Tahoe Metropolitan Planning Organization (TMPO), the Tahoe Regional Planning Agency (TRPA) leads transportation planning and funding for the Lake Tahoe Region by managing the Regional Transportation Plan, Federal Transportation Improvement Program, and an Overall Work Plan. Under federal law and the authority of the states of Nevada and California, the TMPO Governing Board is comprised of the TRPA Governing Board with the addition of a voting representative of the USDA Forest Service, Lake Tahoe Basin Management Unit.

 

Cortez Masto, Rosen Announce $24 Million for Road Safety and Trail Improvements Along Lake Tahoe’s East Shore

Cortez Masto, Rosen Announce $24 Million for Road Safety and Trail Improvements Along Lake Tahoe’s East Shore

Contacts: Press@CortezMasto.Senate.gov
Jeff Cowen, Tahoe Regional Planning Agency Public Information Officer, jcowen@trpa.gov

Washington, D.C. – Today, U.S. Senators Catherine Cortez Masto (D-Nev.) and Jacky Rosen (D-Nev.) announced $24,026,333 million in funding from the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law to extend the popular Tahoe East Shore Trail. This grant award is part of the U.S. Department of Transportation’s (DOT) Rebuilding American Infrastructure with Sustainability and Equity (RAISE) grant program and will fund vital road safety and trail improvements along State Route 28 on Tahoe’s eastern shore. Cortez Masto and Rosen passed the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law to support this program and pushed to secure this critical funding.

“I’ve said throughout my time in the Senate that investing in transportation improvements around the Lake Tahoe Basin is just common sense – it supports our economy, keeps people safe, and protects our beautiful shoreline,” said Senator Cortez Masto. “I’m proud to secure this funding to expand the popular East Shore Trail which serves thousands of visitors and locals alike. I’ll always fight to address local challenges and deliver for Lake Tahoe’s communities.”

“Lake Tahoe is a stunning natural landmark in Nevada and an integral part of our economy, which is why I’m committed to delivering federal funding to support sustainable outdoor recreation and local tourism throughout the region,” said Senator Rosen. “I’m proud to have worked across party lines to secure this major funding to expand the Tahoe East Shore Trail and improve access, safety, and environmental sustainability around the Tahoe Basin.”

“We are honored to receive the $24 million RAISE Grant, a pivotal investment that will substantially enhance safety, access, and resources within our community,” said Alexis Hill, Chair of the Tahoe Transportation District. “This funding is instrumental in our efforts to protect public lands and beaches, ensuring their preservation and accessibility for all. It marks a significant advancement in our mission to elevate transportation infrastructure while safeguarding the natural beauty that defines Tahoe.”

“We are grateful to the administration and our congressional delegation for supporting regional transportation solutions that protect this national treasure,” Tahoe Regional Planning Agency Executive Director Julie Regan said. “Collaborative investment in the Lake Tahoe Environmental Improvement Program from federal, local, state, and private partners is critical to addressing Tahoe’s rural transportation and recreation challenges.

“We are thrilled to learn that Lake Tahoe has been awarded a RAISE grant for SR 28, especially this week, as we celebrate the 5th anniversary of the grand opening of the East Shore Trail. This grant will allow partners to expand the Trail to Thunderbird Cove, and eventually all the way to Spooner Summit,” said Amy Berry, Tahoe Fund CEO. “With the support of hundreds of philanthropic donors, the East Shore Trail is a tremendous example of the power of public-private partnerships to improve the Lake Tahoe environment for all to enjoy.”

“We’re thrilled this funding will create safe transportation choices for residents and visitors to experience all Lake Tahoe has to offer. This RAISE grant will enable the extension of the popular multi-use trail along SR28 by 1.75 miles, accommodating cycling, walking and jogging, while experiencing the beauty of the lake. New, additional parking will also provide safe access to beaches and trails,” Nevada Department of Transportation (NDOT) Director Tracy Larkin Thomason said.

The narrow, two-lane Nevada State Route 28 is the only road around Lake Tahoe’s eastern shore and is critical for everything from emergency vehicles to tourists – on an average summer day over 2,000 people access this area for recreation. The lack of parking and connecting paths has created serious congestion and safety concerns. The new Tahoe East Shore Trail from Incline Village to Sand Harbor has created a popular, safer option for visitors and Nevadans. This RAISE grant will expand the trail and add new pathways, vistas, safety signage, and pedestrian access points. In addition to this investment, Cortez Masto and Rosen have secured grants to support cleaner buses, smarter transportation technology, and evacuation preparations around the lake.

Read more…

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Summer Issue of Tahoe In Depth Has Arrived

Summer Issue of Tahoe In Depth Has Arrived

The 26th issue of Tahoe In Depth is hitting the streets and will be in mailboxes soon. Enjoy articles on the Motel 6 acquisition and restoration, reintroducing Lahontan cutthroat trout, Tahoe Blue Beaches, and many more.